Importance of Being Ernest – VENUE CHANGE

ernest finalPlease note: Watch City Players will now be presenting The Importance of Being Ernest in Cambridge, MA, at Clement G. Morgan Park, 60 Columbia Street.

Watch City Players will perform a modern re-interpretation of this much loved classic in a style we hope would make Oscar Wilde weep tears of Queer Pride. This dapper, Queer, dandified, gender-exploded, trivial comedy for serious people will be performed on July 26th, at 7pm.

Want a reminder? Join our event on Google+ or Facebook.

Monologue Monday: Bottom’s Dream

Welcome to another Monologue Monday, where every Monday we share a monologue read by one of our actors. This week’s monologue is given by the character Bottom in Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Iv.i, and is read by Frances.

When my cue comes, call me, and I will answer: my next is, `Most fair Pyramus.’ Heigh-ho! Peter Quince! Flute, the bellows-mender! Snout, the tinker! Starveling! God’s my life, stolen hence, and left me asleep! I have had a most rare vision. I have had a dream, past the wit of man to say what dream it was: man is but an ass, if he go about to expound this dream. Methought I was—there is no man can tell what. Methought I was,—and methought I had,—but man is but a patched fool, if he will offer to say what methought I had. The eye of man hath not heard, the ear of man hath not seen, man’s hand is not able to taste, his tongue to conceive, nor his heart to report, what my dream was. I will get Peter Quince to write a ballad of this dream: it shall be called Bottom’s Dream, because it hath no bottom; and I will sing it in the latter end of a play, before the duke

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Monologue Monday: At One O’clock in the Morning

Welcome to another Monologue Monday, where every Monday we share a monologue read by one of our actors. This week’s piece is the poem `At One O’clock in the Morning’ by Charles Baudelaire, and is read by Lenny.

 

Note: this is an .mp3 audio file, and should be readable in most browsers. If you are unable to play it, you may download the file here.

Monologue Monday: Ye elves

Welcome to another Monologue Monday, where every Monday we share a monologue read by one of our actors. This week’s monologue is Prospero’s promise to give up magic from Shakespeare’s The Tempest, V.i, and is read by Eboracum.

Ye elves of hills, brooks, standing lakes and groves,
And ye that on the sands with printless foot
Do chase the ebbing Neptune and do fly him
When he comes back; you demi-puppets that
By moonshine do the green sour ringlets make,
Whereof the ewe not bites, and you whose pastime
Is to make midnight mushrooms, that rejoice
To hear the solemn curfew; by whose aid,
Weak masters though ye be, I have bedimm’d
The noontide sun, call’d forth the mutinous winds,
And ‘twixt the green sea and the azured vault
Set roaring war: to the dread rattling thunder
Have I given fire and rifted Jove’s stout oak
With his own bolt; the strong-based promontory
Have I made shake and by the spurs pluck’d up
The pine and cedar: graves at my command
Have waked their sleepers, oped, and let ‘em forth
By my so potent art. But this rough magic
I here abjure, and, when I have required
Some heavenly music, which even now I do,
To work mine end upon their senses that
This airy charm is for, I’ll break my staff,
Bury it certain fathoms in the earth,
And deeper than did ever plummet sound
I’ll drown my book.

Note: this is a .wav audio file, and should be readable in most browsers. If you are unable to play it, you may download the file here.

Monologue Monday: As Just a Man

Welcome to another Monologue Monday, where every Monday we share a monologue read by one of our actors. We might be a little late this time around, but hey, we’re still squeaking in before midnight! This week’s monologue is from Shakespeare’s Hamlet, III.ii, and features Hamlet praising his friend Horatio for the latter’s even-headedness. Hamlet is read by Frances, and Horatio by Eboracum.

 

HAMLET
Horatio, thou art e’en as just a man
As e’er my conversation coped withal.

HORATIO
O, my dear lord,—

HAMLET
Nay, do not think I flatter;
For what advancement may I hope from thee
That no revenue hast but thy good spirits,
To feed and clothe thee? Why should the poor be flatter’d?
No, let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp,
And crook the pregnant hinges of the knee
Where thrift may follow fawning. Dost thou hear?
Since my dear soul was mistress of her choice
And could of men distinguish, her election
Hath seal’d thee for herself; for thou hast been
As one, in suffering all, that suffers nothing,
A man that fortune’s buffets and rewards
Hast ta’en with equal thanks: and blest are those
Whose blood and judgment are so well commingled,
That they are not a pipe for fortune’s finger
To sound what stop she please. Give me that man
That is not passion’s slave, and I will wear him
In my heart’s core, ay, in my heart of heart,
As I do thee.

Note: this is a .wav audio file, and should be readable in most browsers. If you are unable to play it, you may download the file here.

Open Mic in Cambridge

Theatrical Open Mic without textJoin us on July 12 for an open performance opportunity. Stage scenes, monologues, and poetry before an audience of peers. Original and pre-existing works are both accepted: bring a prepared piece, or else browse our collection of provided materials for inspiration. Performance slots are five minutes each.

Where: The Democracy Center, Cambridge
Time: 7:30-10:30 PM, sign-up starts at 7:00

For questions, contact Frances Kimpel at kimpel.hq@gmail.com

WCP presents THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING ERNEST

Watch City Players will perform a modern re-interpretation of the much loved classic, The Importance of Being Ernest, in a style we hope would make Oscar Wilde weep tears of Queer Pride. This dapper, Queer, dandified, gender-exploded, trivial comedy for serious people will be performed on July 26th.

Stay tuned for sneak peeks into the production process!

Monologue Monday: Ultimatum to Henry V

Welcome to another Monologue Monday, where every Monday we share a monologue read by one of our actors. This week’s monologue is from Shakespeare’s Henry V, III.vi, and features the French herald Montjoy and delivering a demand for surrender from the French King to King Henry. It is read by Eboracum.

Thus says my king: Say thou to Harry of England:
Though we seemed dead, we did but sleep: advantage
is a better soldier than rashness. Tell him we
could have rebuked him at Harfleur, but that we
thought not good to bruise an injury till it were
full ripe: now we speak upon our cue, and our voice
is imperial: England shall repent his folly, see
his weakness, and admire our sufferance. Bid him
therefore consider of his ransom; which must
proportion the losses we have borne, the subjects we
have lost, the disgrace we have digested; which in
weight to re-answer, his pettiness would bow under.
For our losses, his exchequer is too poor; for the
effusion of our blood, the muster of his kingdom too
faint a number; and for our disgrace, his own
person, kneeling at our feet, but a weak and
worthless satisfaction. To this add defiance: and
tell him, for conclusion, he hath betrayed his
followers, whose condemnation is pronounced. So far
my king and master; so much my office.

Note: this is a .wav audio file, and should be readable in most browsers. If you are unable to play it, you may download the file here.

Monologue Monday: Ariel’s report to Prospero

Welcome to another Monologue Monday, where every Monday we share a monologue read by one of our actors. This week’s monologue is given by the character Ariel in Shakespeare’s The Tempest, and is read by Frances.

I boarded the king’s ship; now on the beak,
Now in the waist, the deck, in every cabin,
I flamed amazement: sometime I’ld divide,
And burn in many places; on the topmast,
The yards and bowsprit, would I flame distinctly,
Then meet and join. Jove’s lightnings, the precursors
O’ the dreadful thunder-claps, more momentary
And sight-outrunning were not; the fire and cracks
Of sulphurous roaring the most mighty Neptune
Seem to besiege and make his bold waves tremble,
Yea, his dread trident shake.
[...]
Not a soul
But felt a fever of the mad and play’d
Some tricks of desperation. All but mariners
Plunged in the foaming brine and quit the vessel,
Then all afire with me: the king’s son, Ferdinand,
With hair up-staring,—then like reeds, not hair,—
Was the first man that leap’d; cried, ‘Hell is empty
And all the devils are here.’

Note: this is a .wav audio file, and should be readable in most browsers. If you are unable to play it, you may download the file here.

Monologue Monday: Thou, Nature, art my goddess

Introducing Monologue Monday, where every Monday we share a monologue read by one of our actors. This week’s monologue is given by the character Edmund in Shakespeare’s King Lear, I.ii, and is read by Eboracum.

Thou, nature, art my goddess; to thy law
My services are bound. Wherefore should I
Stand in the plague of custom, and permit
The curiosity of nations to deprive me,
For that I am some twelve or fourteen moon-shines
Lag of a brother? Why bastard? wherefore base?
When my dimensions are as well compact,
My mind as generous, and my shape as true,
As honest madam’s issue? Why brand they us
With base? with baseness? bastardy? base, base?
Who, in the lusty stealth of nature, take
More composition and fierce quality
Than doth, within a dull, stale, tired bed,
Go to the creating a whole tribe of fops,
Got ‘tween asleep and wake? Well, then,
Legitimate Edgar, I must have your land:
Our father’s love is to the bastard Edmund
As to the legitimate: fine word,—legitimate!
Well, my legitimate, if this letter speed,
And my invention thrive, Edmund the base
Shall top the legitimate. I grow; I prosper:
Now, gods, stand up for bastards!

Note: this is a .wav audio file, and should be readable in most browsers. If you are unable to play it, you may download the file here.

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